Senate plan is biggest cut yet to health-care safety net
June 26, 2017

Timothy McBride, professor at the Brown School and co-director of the Center for Health Economics and Policy, expects that the bill will lead to over 24 million people being uninsured and very large, perhaps devastating, cuts to the Medicaid program, which currently covers about 75 million children, disabled, aged and other adults.

 

Some ACA costs are offset by societal savings linked to fewer home delinquencies
June 13, 2017

Low-income people who gain health insurance are much more likely to make their rent and mortgage payments, according to a new Washington University study of families living near the poverty line. Lead researcher Emily Gallagher, with the Center for Social Development (CSD), says “the spin-off benefits to the community may offset a substantial share of the cost of the subsidy program. Not only do the banks and landlords benefit, but the entire community gains through lower rates of homelessness and abandoned property.” The study is one of the first to show the effect of the Affordable Care Act on family finances and the first to show the financial impact of the Marketplace component of the program.

 

Aldermen host second Housing Urban Development public hearing to discuss development incentives

June 13, 2017

City residents were invited to voice their opinions on how the city should support housing and economic development at the second public hearing before the HUDZ committee of the Board of Aldermen, chaired by Alderman Joe Roddy (17th). Brown School MSW ’17 Alum, Jessica Payne, along with Molly Metzger, PhD and chairperson of the Brown School’s social and economic development concentration, cautioned Aldermen and the St. Louis Development Corporation against overuse of Tax Abatements and TIFs with a racial equity lens.

 

St. Louis voters approved $5 million for affordable housing, but budget routinely falls short
May 22, 2017

St. Louis is on track to underfund the city’s Affordable Housing Trust Fund for the sixth straight year, despite a $5 million minimum annual allocation voters passed in 2002. This comes about a month after voters approved a half-cent sales tax increase for public transit and affordable housing. Washington University assistant professor Molly Metzger, chairperson of the Brown School’s social and economic development concentration, said funding for housing had implications for the city’s biggest priority, public safety, as well as student success rates in public schools.

 

Uninsured breast cancer patients more likely to die
May 8, 2017

Uninsured women with breast cancer were nearly 2.6 times more likely to have a late stage diagnosis than cancer patients who were insured, finds a new study from Kimberly Johnson, associate professor at the Brown School. The study, “Breast Cancer Stage Variation and Survival in Association with Insurance Status and Sociodemographic Factors in US Women 18 to 64 Years Old,” was published in the April issue of the journal Cancer.

 

New guidelines for smart decarceration offer concrete strategies for policymakers
May 3, 2017

“As the era of mass incarceration appears to be coming to an end, promoting smart decaraceration in the United States requires deliberate action,” said Pettus-Davis, assistant professor and director of the Institute for Advancing Justice Research and Innovation. Pettus-Davis is co-author of “Guideposts for the Era of Smart Decarceration: Smart Decarceration Strategies for Practitioners, Advocates, Reformers, and Researchers,” along with Matthew Epperson of the University of Chicago and Annie Grier, project manager at the Brown School’s Center for Social Development.

 

Missouri Senate votes to fully fund the School Foundation Formula
April 25, 2017

For the first time since 2005, the school foundation formula will be fully funded. This will allow state funding to be allocated to previous legislation such as the PreK law of 2014. This legislation provides that schools can receive state funding for up to four percent of their at-risk three and four year olds enrolled in early childhood programs.

 

Clark-Fox Policy Institute launches
April 23, 2017

The Clark-Fox Policy Institute at the Brown School officially opened with a launch event April 19 in Hillman Hall. The launch event, “Amplifying Impact: Launching a Platform for Connecting Evidence to Policy,” was held in the Clark-Fox Forum. In addition to the launch event, the institute has released its first policy brief, “Credit Where It’s Due: Establishing an Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) for Missouri’s Working Families in Need.”

 

The Earned Income Tax Credit and the white working class
April 18, 2017

In a recent blog post, the Brookings Institution outlines the broad-reaching benefits of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), particularly how it crosses race and education lines, as well as rural and urban boundaries. Since it’s creation in 1975, the EITC has gained bi-partisan support and has shown to reduce poverty, encourage work, and provide long-lasting positive effects for low- and moderate-income families and children.

 

Students Engage in Policy Practice on Capitol Hill
March 29, 2017

 

With Capitol Hill as their classroom, 23 Brown School students spent Spring Break immersed in policy education and training in Washington, D.C.  Throughout the week, they learned from a variety of policy practitioners and government officials working on issues connected to the Brown’s School’s core mission of advancing social change through education, research excellence and policy.

 

Debate over funding of a new soccer stadium in St. Louis continues with a discussion about the need for affordable housing. “The Affordable Housing Trust Fund is a tool the city has to improve neighborhoods, households and the families that reside in them,” Karl Guenther said. Advocates who oppose Proposition 1 (a 0.05% use tax increase) argue that if passed, the excess funds should go towards housing, not a stadium. Assistant professor, Molly Metzger provides valuable insight in this article.

 

St. Louis leaders discuss upcoming mayoral election, issues facing the region
February 27, 2017

A trio of St. Louis political and business leaders talked about economic and racial issues surrounding the April 4 St. Louis mayoral election, the first in 16 years not to feature current Mayor Francis Slay. The panel was co-hosted by the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement and the Clark-Fox Policy Institute at the Brown School Friday.

Click here to view a recording of the panel discussion.

 

St. Louis Mayoral Forum 2017
February 22, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

The City of St. Louis is preparing to elect a new mayor for the first time in 16 years. The Clark-Fox Policy Institute co-sponsored a mayoral forum that allowed concerned voters to hear directly from the candidates on issues facing the City. Held at The Sheldon before a standing room only crowd, the forum focused on youth well-being and opportunity, neighborhood improvement, racial equity, and leadership and management styles. A conglomerate of community organizations, including For the Sake of All, organized the forum using the Forward Through Ferguson report as a guide for the discussion. Click this link to watch a recording of the forum.

 

Brown School statement on immigration executive order
January 30, 2017

Brown School Dean Mary McKay issues statement on the impact of the immigration executive order and reiterates the School’s commitment for advancing equity and social change.

 

Home Delinquency Rates are Lower Among Households in the Affordable Care Act Marketplace
January 12, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

A new study, “Home Delinquency Rates Are Lower Among ACA Marketplace Households: Evidence from a Natural Experiment,” published through the Brown School’s Center for Social Development, shows that families who get health insurance through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) are  more likely to make their rent and mortgage payments than are those who remain uninsured.